Tobii Tip: Eyes

The Tobii eye gaze technology (EGT) does not work well on dry eyes. I’ve been using EGT for almost three years now, and in that time, I have unintentionally trained my eyes to stay open for long periods of time. My guesstimate is that I can go up to three minutes without blinking – this is a conservative judgment on my part; I bet if my eye movements were scrutinized under laboratory conditions, the time elapsed between blinks would be much higher. This is not a good thing.

Dry eyes will play havoc with Tobii’s EGT confusing the infrared sensors’ targeting mechanism. You think you’ve got a good calibration and you’re chugging along hitting all your targets, then your cursor starts to dart all over the screen selecting every item but the one you desire. Before you have your caregiver throw Tobii out of the window, close your eyes and count to ten. In most cases, this will take care of the problem sparing you the tedious task of recalibration.

Also, remember to take frequent breaks from your Tobii: this can range from closing your eyes for five minutes or shifting your gaze to something other than your Tobii screen. Following these actions can help with eye fatigue.

Copyright © 2016 Kipling A. Jackson

Tobii Tip: USB Ports

The snazzy Tobii Dynavox I + Series  speech generating devices (SGD) come equipped with 1 USB 3.0 port and 2 USB 2.0 ports for a total of 3 USB ports (my older model comes with these same ports). Yee-Haw!

Wait a  minute, Sir Kipling, why are you so excited about this? It means nothing to me.

Okay, okay, let me explain. The presence of these ports means you can attach an external device to your Tobii. Cool! You can download photos from your camera, phone, tablet, or video camera – and much, much more.

Upset that your Tobii device doesn’t come with a CD/DVD player? No problem. Go to Amazon and purchase an external player (cost around $25 for a good one) and play your favorite movies (or porn, you Sickos!) till your eyes bleed.

Staying up at night wondering how in the Hell you are gonna place your extensive iTunes library (mine is 110 gigs) on a 120 gig hard drive and still have space leftover? Simply go to that magical website, Amazon.com, and purchase an external hard drive (a 1 Terabyte hard drive costs around 60 bucks; 1 TB = 1000 GB or gigs). Whew! Now that’s a lot of memory. You can keep your music, movies, and those freak-nasty, skin-slapping nudie flicks that you’ve been hiding from your spouse (Ya Prevert!) stored on these hard drives. Better yet, you can hook up the drive via a USB connection to your Tobii and listen or watch it on your SGD without having your files take up valuable memory on your Tobii.

Until next time, Happy Tobiing!

Copyright © 2016 Kipling A. Jackson

A Word on Trachs and Ventilation

I still remember when I came out of my tracheostomy surgery, my neurologist was standing at the foot of my bed looking down at me with disapproving eyes. The good doctor was against the trach from the start saying that my quality of life would plummet.

At the time, I was doing as much as 18 hours of chest percussion, cough assist, and suction to get rid of secretions in my chest. You see, I have bad allergies accompanied by a nasty post-nasal drip – the mucus would drip down my throat and end up in my lungs. This troublesome process of removing the secretions was extremely exhausting. It’s no fun when you constantly deal with the sensation of drowning. This was not the way I wanted to live. So, I pondered the question: how is getting trached going to deteriorate my quality of life further?

Yeah, I was terrified of the surgery. On top of this, my lungs didn’t function at all (I had been fully vented for the previous six months).

The surgery gave me instant relief – the new hole in my throat allowed my caregivers to bypass the mouth and go straight into my lungs; it now took seconds to clear secretions.

Getting trached was the best decision I have ever made; my quality of life improved drastically and I’ve never slept better.

If my life with ALS is better being trached then why was my neurologist against it? Furthermore, I’ve heard that mine isn’t an isolated experience as far as receiving misinformed advice from neurologists is concerned (i.e. “you’ll be attached to a machine for the rest of your life”, or “it will only add, at best, a couple of years to your life”). Which begs the question: should they be giving advice about the tracheostomy and ventilation techniques to their ALS patients in the first place? Now, taking into account the obvious fact that their specialty lies within the physiological realm of the brain and not the pulmonary system, the answer is an emphatic Hell no! You wouldn’t go to a McDonald’s for an oil change, would you? It’s the same premise here.

Dear Neurologists:

I have the utmost respect for you and I know that one day you will find a cure for this disease. But, until then, when your ALS patient inquires about artificial ventilation possibilities, instead of passing on your opinions beyond the scope of your expertise, please refer them to professionals who specialize in the pulmonary system such as a pulmonologist,  an ENT doctor, or a respiratory therapist.

And for the ALS patient, if you are interested in getting trached and ventilation, I implore you to get advice from these afore mentioned professionals who specialize in the pulmonary field or ask one of us who actually lives with a trach and is ventilated before making a final decision.

For more on this topic, check out the PowerPoint presentation on my “Videos” page.

Copyright © 2016 Kipling A. Jackson